Northern red-legged frog (Rana aurora), Island Center Forest, Tim DiChiara Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), Sylvan beach, Tim DiChiara Acorn barnacles (Balanus glandula), Maury Island, Tim DiChiara Honey bee (Apis mellifera), Maury Island, Tim DiChiara Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), Point Robinson, Elizabeth VanDeventer Shield-backed kelp crab (Pugettia productus), Raab's Lagoon, Tim DiChiara Wooly bear caterpillar (Pyrrharctia isabella), Maury Island, Tim DiChiara Sundew (Drosera Rotundifolia), Whispering Firs Bog, Tim DiChiara Long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum), Neill Point Preserve, Tim DiChiara

Featured photo Common Goldeneye
Species details
Common name: Common Goldeneye
Scientific name: Bucephala clangula
Other names: Clangula clangula
Family: Anatidae
Origin: Native
Status on Vashon: Common
Description:

The Common Goldeneye is a medium-sized sea duck of the genus Bucephala, the goldeneyes. The species is aptly named for its golden-yellow eye. Adult males have a dark head with a greenish gloss and a circular white patch below the eye, a dark back and a white neck and belly. Adult females have a brown head and a mostly grey body. Their legs and feet are orange-yellow.

Their breeding habitat is the taiga. They are found in the lakes and rivers of boreal forests across Canada and the northern United States, Scandinavia and northern Russia. They are migratory and most winter in protected coastal waters or open inland waters at more temperate latitudes. Naturally, they nest in cavities in large trees. They will readily use nestboxes, and this has enabled a healthy breeding population to establish in Scotland where they are increasing and slowly spreading with the help of nestboxes. They are usually quite common in winter around lakes of Britain and some are being encouraged to nest in nestboxes which are put up to try to have them there all year round. Occasionally recorded as a vagrant in various parts of the Indian Subcontinent.

Often the natural tree cavities are made by broken limbs, unless they are made by Pileated Woodpeckers or Black Woodpeckers, the only tree cavity-making animals who make a cavity large enough to normally accommodate a goldeneye. The female does all the incubating and is abandoned by the male about 1 to 2 weeks into incubation. The young remain in the nest for about 24-36 hours. Brood parasitism is quite common both with other Common Goldeneyes as well as other duck species and even Tree Swallow and European Starling eggs have been found mixed with goldeneye eggs. The broods commonly start to mix with other females broods as they become more independent. Goldeneye young have been known to be competitively killed by other goldeneye mothers, Common Loons and Red-necked Grebes. The young are capable of flight at 55-65 days of age.

Goldeneyes are diving birds that forage underwater. Year-round, about 32 percent of their prey is crustaceans, 28 percent is aquatic insects and 10 percent is molluscs. Insects are the predominant prey while nesting and crustaceans are the predominant prey during migration and winter. Locally, fish eggs and aquatic plants can be important foods.

--Wikipedia

More details: Encyclopedia of Life
Share this page:
  
        

More photos
Exit
Species
No Caption

More Photos:


Submit your own photos Do you have some great photos of the Common Goldeneye taken on Vashon that you want to share with the world? Submit them here and we'll post them on the site!

1. Upload Pictures:


Works in all browsers


Your browser supports multi-file uploads!

2. Enter Data:


Allowed Characters: a-z A-Z .,':!-

Choose an upload method first!


Exit
Username:
Password:

Welcome, Guest. If you have an account, Login
© 2013, LIFEONVASHON.COM
Biodiversity on Vashon Island, Washington, USA
info@LifeOnVashon.com
Administration/Database/Photo Uploader system © Julian90090